Corn – 4/2

Today we’ll look at Illinois Corn!

Start with this video overview: Corn https://youtu.be/zt1bQBWjYmQ

Start off with learning more about corn.

Click the video to learn more about Illinois corn

K-3

Examine our Young Reader on Illinois Corn http://www.agintheclassroom.org/TeacherResources/Young%20Reader%20Fact%20Sheets/FieldCornYoungReader.pdf

As we mentioned in the first video, corn always has an even number of rows. You will see this on sweet corn you eat, the field corn that Illinois farmers grow and even popcorn. Consider playing an odd and even game with a pair of dice you have from another game.

STEM

Cornstarch and water can form a non-Newtonian fluid. Learn more about these fluids that sometimes act solid, and sometimes act like a liquid at :

https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/1502-non-newtonian-fluids

You can make your own non-Newtonian fluid, that is commonly called “Oobleck”. Check out the recipe at:

And of course, you could try to fill a swimming pool with Oobleck, like talks show host Ellen did!

4-8

And wouldn’t it be cool if we could use corn to replace plastics all around you? Watch this!

Read more about bioplastics at:

And finally, a little musical interlude about corn….and other grains…from The Peterson Brothers!

Assessment Time!

K-3.

  1.  List the Even numbers you find up to 10.  (2, 4, 6, 8, 10)
  2. Name the three types of corn (field corn, sweet corn, popcorn)
  3. What is your favorite type of corn to eat?

*Write a story about where you find corn in your house.

4-8

  1. What is the renewable fuel made from corn called?  (Ethanol)
  2. Where is the National Corn to Ethanol Research Center located (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)
  3. Describe  a non-Newtonian fluid  (Oobleck is a non-Newtonian fluid, because it changes  flow rate under stress)

*What forms of plastic do you use frequently that could be transitioned into bio-based plastic?

*What career opportunities do you see in the field of bioplastics?

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